Tullyhogue


Welcome to Tullyhogue's own web site. Found in the heart of mid-Ulster, Tullyhogue is Northern Ireland's premier tourist attraction. Oft neglected by so-called Tourists and Tourist Boards, this web site aims to put Tullyhogue in its rightful place as the premier tourist attraction in Ulster. Despite the building of new suburbs, Harpurville and Onion Park, the ancient character of the village remains intact and should be a must for any visitor to the province. Some of its many attractions are listed below.

Local Resident
Local Resident

Tullyhogue Fort


The crowning place of the ancient Kings of Ulster, the O'Neills, until the flight of the Earls in 1607. Come and visit this ancient bastion, standing many hundreds of feet above the ancient village of Tullyhogue. From it's mighty towers, it is possible to see all six counties of Northern Ireland - Lough Neagh, the Mourne Mountains, Upper and Lower Lough Erne, the Antrim Mountains and the city hall in Belfast. The spectacular changing of the guard ceremony can be seen twice daily from April until October, but plan ahead, as the unwary visitor may find it difficult to get a good view of the proceedings.

Fort
West Tower

Tullyhogue Harbour

No visit to Tullyhogue would be complete without a stroll round the ancient harbour. Although principally developed by the imagination of local people, the harbour has served a useful purpose for many years, but in recent years it's purpose has been mostly recreational. A key feature of the village it features largely in directions given to tourists by the locals.

Harbour

Tullyhogue Public House

In days of yore, Tullyhogue had three public houses where the local inhabitants could make merry. Sadly now one remains but to keep the spirit of days gone by alive, the pub currently goes by four names.

The Pub

 

The Half Way House.

If you start any journey from, Tullyhogue you will find that the pub will be exactly half way between your starting point and your destination. Despite the constraints of Newtonian physics, this amazing fact is readily explained, when one realises that after a few hours spent in the pub, one's original destination is lost in the mists of time (Guinness and Bushmills Whiskey) and it becomes a challenge just to find ones way home again - hence the pub is the exact halfway point on ones journey.

McQueen's.

The McQueen family was the pub landlords for over five hundred years until recent times. The name remains though and is ingrained on the local populace.

The Tullyhogue Arms.

This name was dreamt up late (very late!) one evening by a Scottish immigrant to the village. Although the reasoning for the derivation of the new name remains vague, it is believed to have been deemed necessary, as the pub regulars were usually legless.

Murphy's.

After it's current landlords, who have about another 498 years to go before they break the McQueen's record. Responsible for reviving the mighty Tullyhogue darts team who still are the best darts side in Tullyhogue.

 

The Priory

The Priory in Tullyhogue is a splendid example of how the classic architecture of the village juxtaposes seamlessly with its cultural heritage. Jonathan Swift, whilst Dean of Dublin cathedral spent some time at the priory in Tullyhogue where he wrote his famous book 'Gulliver's Travels'. Perhaps a more appropriate title would have been Gullible's Travels as Swift only intended to spend one night at the priory, but on his return journey to Dublin, he though it only fair to stop at Tullyhogue pub and have a 'swift' half. It is believed it took him several years to leave the village.

Window Detail

Accommodation

Accommodation in Tullyhogue is plentiful, but the discerning traveller will feel his visit incomplete until he stays at the world renowned McAleftalone's guest house, situated at the end of Main St., Tullyhogue. Rooms are plentiful, well aired and have fine views of the fort, the harbour and the natural countryside. Run by Tullyhogue local, Joe McAleftalone, who prides himself on keeping the village exactly how it was.  Sadly his extensive nature reserve on the edge of the village has now reverted to farmland, but probably still lives on in his own little world.

Luxury Accomodation



In summary, the visitor will find Tullyhogue a very pleasant place but should be careful of the locals habit of teasing the unwary visitor with a bit of good natured banter.

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